BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 5 (Wilkerson)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task. In part two, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were rushing the passer. Most recently, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were defending the run. We’ve since to make comparisons with other players around the league to start making some viable conclusions, looking at nose tackles in part four and, today, Muhammad Wilkerson.

After the jump, we’re going to try and put Wilkerson’s 2013 season into context, by comparing his numbers to those of some similar players and also by looking back at the numbers for 2012.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 4 (Nose Tackles)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task. In part two, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were rushing the passer. Most recently, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were defending the run.

After the jump, we’re going to make the first steps towards drawing some concrete conclusions about the Jets players we have investigated so far, by comparing their numbers to those of some similar players. We start with the nose tackle position.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 3 (Run defense)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task. In part two, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were rushing the passer.

After the jump, we move on to part three, which shows how often each of the Jets defensive linemen were double teamed, including a differentiation between permanent and temporary double teams. I’ll also be seeking to identify trends and differences between how each player was handled or between the approaches taken by each team. Finally, I’ll outline what this data tells us and what additional research would be needed to answer some of the questions that the data alone cannot answer.

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BGA: Wrapping up the 2007 series

Since the season ended, I’ve been charting a series of 2007 games, which – somewhat unexpectedly – gave me a different perspective on some of the issues affecting this current Jets team.

After the jump, we’re wrapping up this series with a recap of what we’ve learned so far, together with some other interesting findings which I haven’t mentioned yet.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 2 (Pass Rush)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task.

After the jump, I share the first set of data, which shows how often each of the Jets defensive linemen were double-teamed or chipped while rushing the passer. I’ll also be seeking to identify trends and differences between how each player was handled or between the approaches taken by each team. Finally, I’ll outline what this data tells us and what additional research would be needed to answer some of the questions that the data alone cannot answer.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 1

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been charting every defensive snap from the 2013 season to try and get a handle on how often each of the Jets defensive linemen were doubled in order to investigate tendencies based on situation, different teams’ schemes and certain individuals.

I’m still in the process of compiling the numbers, which – as you might expect – are fascinating. We’ll get to the first set of numbers in part two in a few days, but before we get to that stage, I wanted to write about what I’ve learned about teams’ approach to who gets double teamed and how they set up their run blocking schemes and protections.

After the jump, I’m going to talk about the methods I’ve employed in compiling this data, how I’ve treated certain situations and what this data tells us. I’ll also be outlining what the data does not tell us.

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BGA: The Strife of Brian

Since the season ended, I’ve been charting a series of 2007 games, which – somewhat unexpectedly – gave me a different perspective on some of the issues affecting this current Jets team.

Today, I’ll be reflecting on Brian Winters’ rookie season by looking back to 2007, where the Jets had similar problems filling their left guard position.

Winters started the last 12 games of 2013 and struggled, although he did show some signs of improvement over the last month. Even though he felt he played well, even Winters himself admitted there was plenty of room for growth. After the jump, a look back at 2007 and what this might tell us about how far Winters has to go.

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BGA: On the nose

During the 2013 offseason, there was plenty of uncertainty over the Jets nose tackle position. Not only was Sione Po’uha – who had been hampered by a back injury throughout the 2012 season – released, but the Jets also lost Mike DeVito to the Chiefs. DeVito had provided the team with a backup option at the nose tackle position while also starting at defensive end.

In order to address this, the Jets signed Chargers veteran Antonio Garay, who had been outstanding in 2011 and played pretty well in 2012 despite missing the start of the season. While the Jets were perhaps hoping that 2011 third round pick Kenrick Ellis would step into a starting role, it was actually 2012 undrafted free agent Damon Harrison who stepped up. With Ellis injured in preseason and only able to play in one game, Harrison made the most of the opportunity to start and deservedly hung onto the job all year with Ellis backing him up. An unimpressive Garay was unable to make the final roster.

After the jump, a look at some numbers and analysis for these this pairing as we aim to project where their careers could be headed over the next few seasons.

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BGA: The Q Miscue?

By contrast to the subject of yesterday’s BGA, Quinton Coples has been one of the most scrutinized players this offseason. Heading into his third year in the league, people are still speculating over whether the way Rex Ryan uses him is a miscalculation on the part of the Jets’ defensive mastermind.

Coples had 4.5 sacks last season, a slight decrease from the 5.5 he managed in his rookie season. Focus on him increased even further when former Jets great Joe Klecko questioned his work ethic. However, there are plenty of overlooked factors which need to be explored in more depth.

After the jump, we consider some of these things and discuss what the Jets can expect from Coples in 2014.

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BGA: The Finau Reckoning

One player who hasn’t received a great deal of attention, despite the fact he was arguably on the brink of a roster spot last year is defensive lineman Tevita Finau. Finau was a final cut at the end of August and remained on the practice squad all year.

Finau is listed at 6’5″ and 288 pounds and, at the age of 28, is awaiting an opportunity for his first NFL regular season action. The New Zealand born former Utah defensive tackle took an extraordinary route to get to this point. Be sure to read Kristian Dyer’s article from last week that goes into more detail on that subject.

After the jump, a brief recap of Finau’s body of work from last preseason, together with a look at what his likely role will be as he competes for a spot this year.

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