When it Comes to the 2013 QBs, Where’s the Boundary Between Need and Common Sense?

Which quarterbacks in this draft class are worth a first round grade?  What players might be a sleeper for a team who has the stomach to hang on?  Are there poor man’s versions of current NFL stars in this class?  It’s going to take a few years to know those answers, but the one sure thing about this draft class is that there’s not much in the way of sure-thing prospects at the quarterback spot.  Geno Smith seems to be emerging as the best of the group, but if teams are being honest with themselves, he’s not a top ten talent.

Even so, it’s the quarterback spot and there’s no more important position in football … so what’s a team with real quarterback concerns this year to do?

Albert Breer has an excellent article on the delicate balancing act that drafting a quarterback can be for any team.  After carefully considering all the options, with the help of an unnamed NFC GM, Breer comes to this conclusion.

So what’s the real danger here for teams? Making sure they’re not creating something that doesn’t exist.

“They touch the ball on every single offensive snap,” said the NFC GM. “Obviously, they’re valuable. It’s the most important position; that’s why they get pushed up, that concept of supply-and-demand. You get into economics, there’s a limited supply. What you can’t do, when you’re looking for one, is listen to the noise, and what people might say the day of (the draft) or the day after.”

In the next breath, the GM added, “You also can’t get cute and say, ‘Let’s see where the world sees him valued at.’ “

Brian Bassett, TheJetsBlog.com

While the whole article is phenomenal, the takeaway for me is that the Jets have to be very careful to not manufacture a player into something he’s not.  As best I can tell, Ryan, Tannenbaum and Woody just did that with their last quarterback and while it’s had some moments, it’s also brought us full circle to the start of Rex’s time with the Jets.