Jets Sign Dee Milliner

New York Jets veteran reporter Randy Lange has announced that the Jets have agreed to terms with first round draft pick Dee Milliner. Rich Cimini of ESPN New York is reporting Milliner received a four-year $12.66 million contract, fully guaranteed.

There was a lot of concern over Milliner’s absence and understandably so. However, to compare this to any Revis-related negotiations was premature. This wasn’t a question of money but rather offset language. The Cardinals signing of Jonathan Cooper earlier today, whose contract contained this offset language, undoubtedly helped to set the bar with Milliner and his agents and arrive to a deal palatable for all parties.

Now that this is settled, the Jets will be able to dedicate their full attention to training camp. Milliner is expected to be in Cortland on Monday where he will be given a physical and should begin practicing within the next few days, if not sooner.

Bent, TheJetsBlog.com

After Jonathan Cooper signed yesterday, this isn’t really surprising. It was claimed Idzik would be “un-bendable” on offsets and that proved to me the case, although their significance is still pretty much lost on me. Organizational philosophy or not, the Jets drew a line in the sand which has cost their top pick a couple of days of valuable preparation time and if offsets were the sticking point as was widely reported then the money involved is hardly substantial. Milliner is reportedly getting the minimum salary in years two, three and four of the deal, so the Jets were essentially haggling over potentially being on the hook for about $500,000 in three years time if they released him and someone else picked him up. Jason from OverTheCap had written that maybe it has more to do with the timing of payments and that seems more plausible to me.

While everyone is reporting this as a four year deal, it should also be noted that there is an automatic fifth year option with all first round picks. Since Milliner was drafted in the top ten, his option operates slightly differently to that of Sheldon Richardson. The Jets have to decide at the end of year three whether to exercise the option, which will extend his contract for one year and pay him the average of the top ten cornerbacks in the league in that fifth season.

The important thing now is that Milliner gets into camp. Traditionally, defensive backs coached by Nick Saban at the college level have taken some time to adjust because NFL coaches employ slightly different techniques, but Milliner had previously said he is comfortable with the scheme and terminology, so hopefully that will smooth the transition.