Offensive Lineman Player Interest List

Here’s the final part of Jake’s player interest list, featuring details of players the Jets have shown interest in, together with accompanying analysis.

Jake Steinberg, TheJetsBlog.com

OT Seantrel Henderson (Miami) 6-7, 331, 5.00 40yd dash
Projection: 5 Description: The Jets sent OL Coach Mike Devlin to Miami’s Pro Day to meet and work out Henderson. Rob Rang says the following: “Henderson continues to be a tough prospect to project because he is extremely talented for a player of his size and strength, but the potential hasn’t necessarily translated to the field. Henderson is a mountain of a man and has enough foot quickness to hold his own on the edge, but the latest report of a failed drug test may drop a player with first-round talent all the way out of the draft. After admitting at the Senior Bowl that he had been suspended for failed marijuana tests multiple times in college, Henderson certainly continues to hurt his own cause by reportedly failing yet another test – and one he knew was coming months in advance.”

OT Dakota Dozier (Furman) 6-4, 313, 5.29 40yd dash
Projection: 3-4 Description: The Jets met with Dozier at the East-West Shrine Game. Here’s more from The Sideline View: “Dozier is well-proportioned with good lower body girth and generates power thanks to his ability to bend and play with a good pad level in the running game. One of the biggest issues I have with tackles is their inability to play under control when climbing to the 2nd level, but Dozier seems to be able to accelerate and gear down in order to catch his 2nd level blocks in his strike zone. At tackle, Dozier was good, not great, at working to get outside on scoop blocks for outside zone plays, but as a guard, his athleticism will be a plus when combined with his natural strength. Due to the level of competition he has faced, Dozier is used to making securing the block upon contact, but on the next level he has to do a better job of continuing to move his feet through contact in order to maintain his positioning. Dozier has good length and foot quickness, but his pass protection technique needs work as he frequently oversets against speed and loses balance when asked to change direction because he gets his weight way too far forward. I understand that he won’t face the exact same issues when he kicks inside to guard (and I think he really needs to), but he has to trust his ability to redirect and remain patient while keeping his weight back. I really like Dozier’s NFL potential, but I do think there will be a learning curve for him as he works his technique issues out.”

OT Matt Feiler (Bloomsburg) 6-6, 330, 5.34 40yd dash
Projection: 6-7 Description: New York Jets O-line coach Mike Devlin went to Bloomsburg pro-day to work out Matt Feiler. He also met with Feiler at his Pro Day. Tony Pauline has more: “Feiler is a college left tackle who projects to either the right side or the guard position in the NFL. He possesses outstanding size, comes with upside, and has the underlying ability to eventually develop into a starter.”

OG Brian Clarke (Bloomsburg) 6-2, 299, 5.10 40yd dash
Projection: UDFA Description: Devlin also worked out Feiler’s teammate, Brian Clarke at Bloomsberg’s Pro Day. NFL Draft Diamonds had this to say: “Brian Clarke definitely has a future at the next level. He is a very polished run blocker, who has dominated opposing defensive lineman in Division 2 football. Clarke’s strengths are his tremendous quickness and agility, football intelligence, strength, and above all, his nastiness in the trenches. Although Clarke is very strong, he is not merely a mauler on the line. His play style favors polished technique and speed as opposed to out muscling the guy in front of him. For now, I view Clarke as being a prospect who could see himself get drafted in the sixth or seventh rounds of the 2014 NFL Draft, but regardless of when he is selected, I expect him to be on an NFL training camp roster come next summer.”

OG Ryan Groy (Wisconsin) 6-5, 316, 5.13 40yd dash
Projection: 7-UDFA Description: The Jets met with Groy at the East-West Shrine Game and also at his Pro Day. Here’s Alex Dunlap’s take: “Groy has a level of position versatility and clear, tested athletic attributes that should, in most every case, translate to some sort of productivity at the NFL level. Groy has good feet, has shown in testing that his lateral agility and balance (at least in a vacuum) could actually be untapped areas of strength functionally on the football field. Groy falls into terribly bad habits, does not play with the best motor and at times can appear to be a liability, even on a Wisconsin offensive line facing collegiate-level competition. Groy is not a player NFL evaluators will project as capable of making an immediate impact upon his arrival in his new NFL city. Groy will, however, almost certainly be drafted – and with proper development and training – reasonably projects to carve out a role for himself through year one with a chance to expand upon it through the remainder of his rookie contract. “

C Gabe Ikard (Oklahoma) 6-4, 304, 5.10 40yd dash
Projection: 4-5 Description: The Jets met with Ikard at the East-West Shrine Game. Dunlap again: “Gabe Ikard is a center prospect in the 2014 NFL draft who lacks elite traits. His size and feet are average at best, and he struggles when facing elite power, speed, flexibility and motor. His combine measurables were encouraging in regard to questions about Ikard’s lateral agility. Clearly, Ikard is a terrific student-athlete and a player whom Oklahoma fans surely loved rooting on through his four years seeing action as a Sooner, but he will not move the evaluative meters of scouts in the same way when they analyze his on-field product. In Ikard, NFL teams and scouts will see a player with tremendous intangibles off the field and very tangible, clear issues on it. Ikard can be a liability with his pad level, balance and follow-through, even when he wins initial battles with a good pop off the line of scrimmage and adequate body positioning. “

OG Xavier Su’a-Filo (UCLA) 6-4, 307, 5.01 40yd dash
Projection: 1 Description: The Jets interviewed Su’a-Filo at the Combine. NFL.com’s scouting report on him says “Quick out of his stance. Effective pass blocker — can bend his knees, extend and mirror in short area. Generates movement in the run game. Can work his hips and maneuver to gain positioning. Good foot athlete. Can pull, trap, combo block and step to the second level. Durable three-year starter. Has played guard and tackle // Lacks ideal length. Missed two years of strength training while serving a LDS mission and has a bad body. Could stand to play with better pop and power in his hands. Bends at the waist, gets overextended and falls off blocks. Heavy-legged — slow to shift his weight and adjust to stunts and quick inside moves. Gets beat across his face. Needs to play with better awareness — gets short-circuited by complicated defensive movement. Struggled mightily at left tackle. // Su’a-Filo is more effective than he is pretty. Projects best at left guard, where he has starter-caliber ability in a power scheme, though he is athletic enough to appeal to zone teams, too.”.

OG James Stone (Tennessee) 6-4, 306, 5.15 40yd dash
Projection: 7-UDFA Description: The Jets interviewed Stone at the East-West Shrine Game. Here’s Dane Brugler’s take: “Tennessee is extremely young at the offensive skill positions, but the offensive line is a veteran group, led by Stone in the middle. In his fourth year as a starter, he is in the conversation to be one of the first players drafted at his position, but his performance against Alabama’s stout front was underwhelming. Stone has good vision and keeps his head on a swivel, but he needs to be more assertive at the point of attack. He engages, but is simply content with getting in the way and not controlling the contact point of the defender. Stone is quick off the ball, but also has a bad habit of popping upright, allowing rushers to get lower and win with leverage. He looks tight when attempting to change directions and struggles to recover after a false step, something that was very evident against the Tide defenders. While Stone is highly thought of by some, his game tape against Alabama won’t do him any favors.”

OG Trai Turner (LSU) 6-3, 310, 4.91 40yd dash
Projection: 4 Description: The Jets interviewed Turner at the Combine. Here’s his take on the meeting. “I was in a meeting with the Jets going over my film. One of the coaches said, ‘Dang, you like to hit people, don’t you?’ I said ‘Yeah’, and the coach said, ‘Well, don’t hit me.’ This is CBS Sports scouting report on him. “Naturally large man with a square frame and long arms. Possesses good initial quickness off the snap for a man of his size, showing the ability to pull as well as release to find linebackers at the second level. Latches on to his opponent with strong hands and can be overpowering, driving defenders backward and occasionally to the turf for the emphatic pancake block. Shows some lateral agility when he keeps his shoulders square, mirroring defenders in pass protection. Some coachable flaws to his game which could be improved upon, giving him some legitimate developmental upside.  Turner’s powerful blocking at right guard played a key role in the progress LSU made in its first season under offensive coordinator Cam Cameron in 2013. For his play, Turner earned Second Team All-SEC honors in his first full season as a starter.  Rather than return to build upon his success, however, Turner made the surprising decision to forgo his final two years of collegiate eligibility and enter the 2014 draft.  Turner is a powerful drive blocker who can dominate in the phone booth. His girth and long arms make him difficult to get around in pass protection, but a lack of balance and lateral agility make him susceptible to quick defensive tackles. Turner could have used more refining before making the jump to the NFL, but the traits to develop are in place.”

Bent, TheJetsBlog.com

Analysis: This may be the most interesting position to watch this weekend. The Jets have several young guys who are really unknown quantities and the amount of urgency they give to addressing this position might give us our first viable clues as to whether they think any of the Aboushi/Campbell/Ijalana/Freeman grouping has any kind of realistic future in the league. It could also give us some clues about just how confident they are in Brian Winters as a full time starter going forward. The poll results from yesterday’s post seemed to suggest most Jets fans wouldn’t want to take a lineman at 18, but might be prepared to move back/forward into the late first/early second round area.




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