Statistical Proof of Mark Sanchez’s Utter Suckitude

Some people hate statistics … and that’s fine … but this Pro Football Focus article that Brandon shared in the comments deserves a read.

From an independent eye, PFF notes that Mark Sanchez is terrible, has always been terrible, and projects to still be terrible for time to come and people who can’t see it are fooling themselves.

PFF rolls off a series of comparative statistics on why Sanchez is not showing any progress and why the team needs to step back from him, even if for the short-term to hit the re-set button on the Jets offense — and maybe even the whole team.

The sad thing is I need to stop myself. I have probably 10 more tables that will highlight how woeful Mark Sanchez has consistently been for the Jets but you already know this. He fails the eye test nearly every time he steps onto a field, and what’s more he doesn’t look all that much better than the rookie we saw step onto the field in 2009. Yes he has won some playoff games but don’t go thinking that was because of his brilliance. That was because of the guys around him. So poor has he been that he has conditioned us to praise him for simply not making the mistakes that have characterized his career.

That the Jets coaches and players can’t see this, and don’t want something done about this speaks volumes for where they appear to be heading. Full scale rebuild.

Brian Bassett, TheJetsBlog.com

I like Rex Ryan and I want him to remain the Jets head coach, but his stubborn unwillingness to do anything at the quarterback spot could get him fired if he isn’t careful.  Ryan’s insistence on staying with Sanchez demonstrates what Ryan thinks of Tebow as a quarterback, and more importantly speaks to the talent that Mike Tannenbaum and Woody Johnson supplied for him.

Many might not see Ryan as the cagey political operator, but I do see his stubborn sticking with Sanchez as extremely risky, but yet possibly a masterful way to silently tell the world that he thinks Tim Tebow is a trainwreck as a quarterback and that he had no part of bringing him into the organization.

To Ryan, maybe staying away from Tebow could be his saving grace in a season that is spiraling the bowl.  If he can control who starts and who sits, then this is the only way he can exert any control on the situation … and letting Tebow actually play could ruin the idea that “Sanchez is the only viable choice we had.”

Still, it’s overindulgent regarding Sanchez, leeway the team’s QB needs like another hole in the head.  If this what Ryan thinks is his best play, then maybe his plan has some merit, but I do think that it could just as easily backfire on him because the ones who sign his checks might not like his total unwillingness to make a effectual change.