The Final Four?

Eric Weeks , TheJetsBlog.com

Pure speculation and conflicting reports have dominated the Jets’ general manager search but to humor ourselves lets take a look at what appears to be the final four candidates for the position.

Ted Sundquist: Sundquist would be cut from the unpopular “retread” mold everyone has been coining lately but he has a varied background dealing with both the salary cap and personnel. It’s difficult to fully gauge his successes and failures because of the attachment to Mike Shanahan in Denver however, at the very least, he has a level of common sense that has at times lacked within the Jets’ front office. Even he could see the potential issues when placing Tim Tebow on a team with Mark Sanchez. Niners Nation wrote an excellent piece breaking down his body of work.

John Idzik: Idzik  served as the assistant general manager in Tampa Bay when the Bucs won the Super Bowl and then arrived in Arizona to serve as senior director of football operations. Though he was not present, the Cardinals went on to bid for the Lombardi trophy against the Steelers. He joined the Seahawks in 2007 as the vice president of football administration where he “oversees player negotiations, the team’s compliance with the NFL salary cap, player personnel transactions, all football operations budgets, staff and team contracts, team travel and most aspects of the day-to-day football operations while also remaining active in player evaluations.” Everywhere he goes, success, at some point, seems to follow…

Omar Khan: Khan began his career in college with the New Orleans Saints working with the salary cap. In 2001, he was hired by the Steelers and has never looked back working his way up to the director of football and business administration. While Khan is what many would deem a “cap guy”, he has done a commendable job managing Pittsburgh’s salary cap while helping to surround the team with consistent playoff-level talent. Delving further into Khan’s experience, we find that in addition to his cap responsibilities he has also worked closely with the Steelers director of football of operations, Kevin Colbert, on personnel matters and is credited with aiding Pittsburgh in their discovery of late round gems (Note: The linked article is well worth the read) such as Ike Taylor and Larry Foote.

Scott Cohen: It’s easy to throw Cohen under the bus because of his association with a certain capologist but we’ll try to give him a fair shake. His responsibilities wavered more on the personnel side of things as he was responsible for scouting potential draft picks and/or undrafted free agents as well as scouting the free agent wire. Obviously, there were some hits and big misses there but it’s difficult to know how far Cohen’s reports went to begin with since Trader Mike was there to override him every step of the way. Unfortunately for Cohen, the majority of fans cannot get past the Tannenbaum connection and while he may have certain qualities that would help the ship run more smoothly, it’s time to move on.