BGA: Scouting Jason Babin

Earlier today, the Jets announced that they had signed 34-year old pass rusher Jason Babin. Babin, a two-time pro bowler had worked out for the Jets on Monday and will presumably be in the mix for a situational pass rushing role, with Antwan Barnes currently on the Physically Unable to Perform list.

The 6-3, 267-pound Babin was a first round draft pick in 2004 and has made stops with several teams since then. He was a pro bowler with Tennessee in 2010 when he registered 12.5 sacks, but he topped that in 2011 with the Eagles when he led the league with 18 sacks and was named as an all-pro. While he hasn’t threatened that number since, he did have seven sacks in 2012 and 7.5 last year.

After the jump we review footage from the 2013 season to try and assess what he still has in the tank and how he might fit into the Jets defense.

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In case you missed it…

Bent recently wrapped up an epic six part series sharing exclusive data on how often Jets players were double teamed in 2013 and then analyzing what we can learn from this. Here are the links in case you want to catch up with this before camp gets underway.

In part one, there’s an explanation of the charting process, together with some examples of different types of double teams and how they’ve been treated in the numbers. Read more here.


Part two went into details of how often each Jets defensive lineman was doubled in the running game and what conclusions we can (and can’t) draw from this. Read more here.


In part three, the process was repeated for the pass rush. Read more here.


Part four saw us make comparisons between the numbers for the Jets nose tackles and other players around the league. How did Kenrick Ellis’ numbers compare with other backups like Ishmai’ily Kitchen? How do Damon Harrison’s numbers stack up with an elite nose tackle like Dontari Poe? Read more here.


The penultimate instalment saw us focusing on Muhammad Wilkerson. Did he see more double teams in 2013? Does he tend to see more double teams than those players who’ve been named to the pro bowl or on top player lists ahead of him? Read more here.


Finally, we looked at Quinton Coples, making an effort to compare him with someone used in a similar manner because a comparison with conventional edge rushers was proven to be inadequate for these purposes. Read more here.

BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 6 (Coples)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

Over the course of this series, I’ve gone into detail about the process of tracking double teams, shared the numbers for each of the Jets linemen in run defense and when rushing the passer and added some extra context by comparing the numbers for Muhammad Wilkerson and the nose tackles with previous seasons and other players around the league. We’ll put up links to all these posts tomorrow.

After the jump, we’re going to wrap up with a quick look at Quinton Coples and what his double team numbers tell us about where he might be on the learning curve as he transitions into a more perimeter-based role.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 5 (Wilkerson)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task. In part two, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were rushing the passer. Most recently, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were defending the run. We’ve since to make comparisons with other players around the league to start making some viable conclusions, looking at nose tackles in part four and, today, Muhammad Wilkerson.

After the jump, we’re going to try and put Wilkerson’s 2013 season into context, by comparing his numbers to those of some similar players and also by looking back at the numbers for 2012.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 4 (Nose Tackles)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task. In part two, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were rushing the passer. Most recently, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were defending the run.

After the jump, we’re going to make the first steps towards drawing some concrete conclusions about the Jets players we have investigated so far, by comparing their numbers to those of some similar players. We start with the nose tackle position.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 3 (Run defense)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task. In part two, I started to share the data in respect of those plays when the Jets were rushing the passer.

After the jump, we move on to part three, which shows how often each of the Jets defensive linemen were double teamed, including a differentiation between permanent and temporary double teams. I’ll also be seeking to identify trends and differences between how each player was handled or between the approaches taken by each team. Finally, I’ll outline what this data tells us and what additional research would be needed to answer some of the questions that the data alone cannot answer.

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BGA: Wrapping up the 2007 series

Since the season ended, I’ve been charting a series of 2007 games, which – somewhat unexpectedly – gave me a different perspective on some of the issues affecting this current Jets team.

After the jump, we’re wrapping up this series with a recap of what we’ve learned so far, together with some other interesting findings which I haven’t mentioned yet.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 2 (Pass Rush)

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

In part one of this series, I set out my methodology for charting every snap from the 2013 season and went through some of the things I learned from undertaking this task.

After the jump, I share the first set of data, which shows how often each of the Jets defensive linemen were double-teamed or chipped while rushing the passer. I’ll also be seeking to identify trends and differences between how each player was handled or between the approaches taken by each team. Finally, I’ll outline what this data tells us and what additional research would be needed to answer some of the questions that the data alone cannot answer.

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BGA: The Double Team Project – Part 1

Traditional statistics and most modern analytics measure how effective a player is without necessarily taking into account assignments or degree of difficulty. While I’ve made passing reference in my game analysis to how often certain players have been double teamed, nobody tracks this, so I’ve been keen to figure out whether the reality matches up to our expectations and my recollection from watching the film.

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been charting every defensive snap from the 2013 season to try and get a handle on how often each of the Jets defensive linemen were doubled in order to investigate tendencies based on situation, different teams’ schemes and certain individuals.

I’m still in the process of compiling the numbers, which – as you might expect – are fascinating. We’ll get to the first set of numbers in part two in a few days, but before we get to that stage, I wanted to write about what I’ve learned about teams’ approach to who gets double teamed and how they set up their run blocking schemes and protections.

After the jump, I’m going to talk about the methods I’ve employed in compiling this data, how I’ve treated certain situations and what this data tells us. I’ll also be outlining what the data does not tell us.

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BGA: The Strife of Brian

Since the season ended, I’ve been charting a series of 2007 games, which – somewhat unexpectedly – gave me a different perspective on some of the issues affecting this current Jets team.

Today, I’ll be reflecting on Brian Winters’ rookie season by looking back to 2007, where the Jets had similar problems filling their left guard position.

Winters started the last 12 games of 2013 and struggled, although he did show some signs of improvement over the last month. Even though he felt he played well, even Winters himself admitted there was plenty of room for growth. After the jump, a look back at 2007 and what this might tell us about how far Winters has to go.

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